Discussion:
Biden Makes An Ass of Himself During CNN Fake News Townhall
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pothead
2021-10-22 14:12:37 UTC
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Demented Joe Biden can't even manage to make it through a fake town
hall where people were invited and the questions and answers were
known prior to the show.
"For Some Reason, Biden Froze Over and Over Like a Robot That Was
Malfunctioning at CNN’s Town Hall"
<https://freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/4005790/posts>
"Beep, bop, boop. It might be time to pull the plug on President Joe
Biden after a long night repeating scripted talking points at CNN’s
town hall on Thursday night.
There were a number of seriously concerning moments when the
president appeared to ‘power down’ in mid-thought or while
interacting with presumably fellow human life.
“He’s rebooting,” Kyle Hooten, managing editor of Alpha News,
remarked.
404: President not found
“404: President not found,” he added.
Is he stuck like that forever or?
pic.twitter.com/aFoQNK9R6W
“Is he stuck like that forever or?” Benny Johnson asked about a
separate senior moment.
Commenters said that he ‘didn’t know what to do with his hands.’
“Dementia,” Tim Young remarked.
pic.twitter.com/d0sNki1x6M
The moment had the Ricky Bobby comparisons flying, and American Woman
added to the mix.
Advertisements But Biden’s brain farts were far from done. Here is an
infamous “shout out” to the wrong person that Biden has become known
for.
Joe Biden says he sees "the Mayor" of Baltimore in the audience
(Brandon Scott)
It's actually Congressman Kweisi Mfume (whose District includes
Morgan State and was never Mayor of Baltimore)
pic.twitter.com/zLOBFgReVp
“Joe Biden says he sees ‘the Mayor’ of Baltimore in the audience
(Brandon Scott),” Zach Parkinson noted. “It’s actually Congressman
Kweisi Mfume (whose District includes Morgan State and was never
Mayor of Baltimore).”
But in addition to Biden’s lapses of basic human functioning were
dictatorial outbursts that displayed the callousness of his
administration.
President Biden heaped mockery upon Americans who insist on the right
to bodily autonomy and the freedom to make their own personal
healthcare choices at a CNN town hall on Thursday night.
VIDEO AT LINK...................
“So the idea is that – look, two things that concern me, one are
those who just try to make this a political issue. Freedom. I have
the freedom to kill you with my Covid. No, come on. Freedom,” he
said.
“Number one. Number two, the second one is that, you know, the gross
misinformation that’s out there,” Biden went on. “Like what they’re
saying about my buddy Colin Powell, he was my friend, passed away.
Colin Powell was vaccinated and he still died. Well, he knew he had
serious underlying conditions and it would be difficult – he clearly
would have been gone earlier had he not gotten the vaccine, had he
not gotten the shots. But my generic point is there’s so much
misinformation.”
Biden is one of the chief spreaders of Covid misinformation in the
country. Biden has no idea of knowing if Colin Powell ‘would have
been gone earlier’ if he hadn’t been vaccinated. The issue is that
Colin Powell’s death was called a ‘death from Covid complications’
when the truth is he had been struggling with blood cancer for some
time. It raises the issue of how many ‘Covid-related deaths’ were not
only among the elderly – 98% of Covid-related deaths were over the
age of 40 – but how many are due to “serious underlying conditions.”
President Biden is ignoring the statements of the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention that Covid vaccination does not stop the
spread of the Delta variant, which is the predominant Covid strain in
the United States today. The CDC Director admitted over a month ago
that the Covid vaccines don’t prevent the spread of the virus.
Biden went so far as to argue that first responders, and others who
have been on the frontlines throughout the pandemic, must get the
vaccine or be fired.
Advertisements Biden just said first responders should be FIRED for
refusing the vaccine. Wow.
Watch. pic.twitter.com/L5vSWTrQvA
Someone pull the plug on the Biden administration. The entire thing
has gone haywire."
I saw some clips of this and it was pathetic. It is painfully obvious
that Joe Biden is suffering from some sort of cognitive decay. He
can't manage to answer simple questions, looks like he is falling
asleep and mumbles incoherently at times. Even with help from the
moderator and a scripted show he couldn't pull it off.

I agree with the OP, someone needs to pull the plug on Biden and his
incompetent administration because they are an embarrassment to the
USA.
--
pothead
Tommy Chong For President 2024
Lifetime Member of "The Prescott Parasite Eradication Team"
Ask snit how he pissed on his cat.
All about snit read below. Links courtesy of Ron:
https://web.archive.org/web/20181028000459/http://www.cosmicpenguin.com/snit.html
https://web.archive.org/web/20190529043314/http://cosmicpenguin.com/snitlist.html
https://web.archive.org/web/20190529062255/http://cosmicpenguin.com/snitLieMethods.html
chrisv
2021-10-22 14:51:04 UTC
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Post by pothead
It is painfully obvious
that Joe Biden is suffering from some sort of cognitive decay.
Why don't you tell us this again? We didn't see it the first 500
times.
vallor
2021-10-22 23:09:32 UTC
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It is painfully obvious that Joe Biden is suffering from some sort of
cognitive decay.
Why don't you tell us this again? We didn't see it the first 500 times.
The newsgroup clearly says "comp.os.linux.muckraker", so... oh wait.

Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
--
-v
rbowman
2021-10-23 00:49:58 UTC
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Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Branimir Maksimovic
2021-10-23 01:00:01 UTC
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Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
--
7-77-777
Evil Sinner!
with software, you repeat same experiment, expecting different results...
RabidHussar
2021-10-23 15:12:38 UTC
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Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
--
@RabidHussar
Happy to shove that vaccine of yours up your ass
RonB
2021-10-23 22:01:40 UTC
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Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
Or perhaps they wanted to run applications not made for Linux. Or perhaps
with not having any to fix on their computers.
--
"Name a product that blames its failure on those who don't use it."

"Women are women and men are men, if you
neuter a rooster he's a capon not a hen."
Branimir Maksimovic
2021-10-24 03:52:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
Or perhaps they wanted to run applications not made for Linux. Or perhaps
with not having any to fix on their computers.
Or perhaps, there is no other platform for M1 processor?
--
7-77-777
Evil Sinner!
with software, you repeat same experiment, expecting different results...
RabidHussar
2021-10-24 16:40:09 UTC
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Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
--
@RabidHussar
Happy to shove that vaccine of yours up your ass
rbowman
2021-10-24 19:45:56 UTC
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Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
The annoying part is Apple... The walls around the garden are rather
high. I haven't been involved in that part of the project but I do know
that while the app was developed with Visual Studio using Xamarin we
have a Mac Mini that's used in the build process. The Mini is sitting on
a bookcase and never has had a display or keyboard afaik but comes into
play somehow.

There is also a requirement to have an Apple account but again I've not
had to get into the details.

Going forward we will be using a SPA with zero footprint but I believe
that has issues with Safari that are not encountered with Firefox or the
chromium based browsers.

I haven't found Linux programming to be annoying. I probably wouldn't
find iOS annoying either but at this point in life I don't have any
interest in finding out.

Since a good deal of my time lately is spent on the Angular app, I could
install node, npm, the Angular cli, and VS Code on an Apple M1 and get
on with life. Not all npm packages support arm64 and I don't know how
much of a hit Rosetta 2 is.
RonB
2021-10-25 00:10:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
--
"Name a product that blames its failure on those who don't use it."

"Women are women and men are men, if you
neuter a rooster he's a capon not a hen."
rbowman
2021-10-25 04:54:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
The base on Linux is the X Windows system. Even with the newer Wayland
XWayland keeps the X interface just like XQuartz for OS X. We use
Motif. Although it is dated it builds directly on X.

Programs developed with Gtk may need libraries to run on KDE, and vice
versa for Qt to run on GNOME but most Linux boxes wind up with both
sooner or later.

Windows is no different. ESRI software requires .NET 3.5 which is not
included in Windows 10 so you have to manually install it. Windows 7,
which is still alive and well despite it all, often required .NET 4.5 or
4.6 to be installed. In VS you can select the target .NET version.

I really should have said .NET Framework. .NET Core 1.0, which is meant
to be cross platform, was released in 2016 and had versions up to 3.1
before MS decided they had confused the world enough and consolidated
Framework and Core in .NET 5. .NET 6 will be out next month.

Third party libraries are often used via NuGet and sometimes the package
was developed with a .NET version incompatible with your target and you
are SOL if you upgrade. That was really a problem with Core.

Then you have Windows Forms and Windows Presentation Foundation.
WinForms goes back to Visual Basic and MS would dearly love to kill it
but there is too much backlash. WPF was going to be phased out to
support Universal Windows Platform in Win 10. UWP apps would have to be
installed via Windows Store. Nice try but most developers said 'Screw that.'

Then there are the dead ends like Silverlight that were going to be The
Next Big Thing.

Yeah, developing for Windows is just as simple as pie. NOT!
RabidHussar
2021-10-25 12:23:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
The base on Linux is the X Windows system. Even with the newer Wayland
XWayland keeps the X interface just like XQuartz for OS X.  We use
Motif. Although it is dated it builds directly on X.
Programs developed with Gtk may need libraries to run on KDE, and vice
versa for Qt to run on GNOME but most Linux boxes wind up with both
sooner or later.
Windows is no different. ESRI software requires .NET 3.5 which is not
included in Windows 10 so you have to manually install it. Windows 7,
which is still alive and well despite it all, often required .NET 4.5 or
4.6 to be installed. In VS you can select the target .NET version.
I really should have said .NET Framework.  .NET Core 1.0, which is meant
to be cross platform, was released in 2016 and had versions up to 3.1
before MS decided they had confused the world enough and consolidated
Framework and Core in  .NET 5.  .NET 6 will be out next month.
Third party libraries are often used via NuGet and sometimes the package
was developed with a .NET version incompatible with your target and you
are SOL if you upgrade. That was really a problem with Core.
Then you have Windows Forms and Windows Presentation Foundation.
WinForms goes back to Visual Basic and MS would dearly love to kill it
but there is too much backlash. WPF was going to be phased out to
support Universal Windows Platform in Win 10. UWP apps would have to be
installed via Windows Store. Nice try but most developers said 'Screw that.'
Then there are the dead ends like Silverlight that were going to be The
Next Big Thing.
Yeah, developing for Windows is just as simple as pie. NOT!
Good to know. In the end, everything's a mess.
--
@RabidHussar
RonB
2021-10-25 13:07:02 UTC
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Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
--
"Name a product that blames its failure on those who don't use it."

"Women are women and men are men, if you
neuter a rooster he's a capon not a hen."
RabidHussar
2021-10-25 13:39:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
--
@RabidHussar
rbowman
2021-10-25 13:48:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Exactly what desktop experience? Many Linux distros look a lot like
Windows, sometimes to their detriment. Many popular applications are on
both platforms. Windows finally caught up with 10 and has multiple
desktops.

At home I have both Windows and Linux available and I use Linux 95% of
the time.
Smit
2021-10-25 18:30:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Exactly what desktop experience? Many Linux distros look a lot like
Windows, sometimes to their detriment. Many popular applications are on
both platforms. Windows finally caught up with 10 and has multiple
desktops.
At home I have both Windows and Linux available and I use Linux 95% of
the time.
I think that most of what is compromised in the Linux desktop experience
has to do with the intuitiveness of the operating system, the clunkiness
of some apps, the inconsistency in the settings applications and the
overall feeling that even though you're supposed to be in complete
control, anything can and likely will fail at any given time. Those
updates, even though they usually work well, they can break things on a
routine basis. To give you an idea, if you're using an NVIDIA GPU and
running something like openSUSE Tumbleweed, you'll install the latest
updates and then, when you reboot, you no longer have access to your
desktop. Most of us will know that it's because the latest NVIDIA GPU,
for whatever reason, isn't supported and that a fix will come after a
few days during which you'll have to use the previous kernel, but
someone who doesn't even know what a kernel is might panic. It's not for
everyone and likely never will be.
--
@RabidHussar
Just brainless trolling. And I am replying to that trolling. THAT is what
the "-hh circus" is.

What did you assume from the lying imbecile? That -hh loon has nothing
to lose but time. He has nothing else, especially not ambition.

He is as incompetent as -hh. -hh can't get anything else to work, either.

Snit just wiped his ass with -hh. For others I would simply think the comment
is dubious. However, given that it's -hh I would drop that step and go straight
to 'drug-induced delusion' because that's most of what he does. Innocent
until proven guilty does not apply to -hh.

--
Do not click this link!
https://www.google.com/search?q=Steve+Petruzzellis+the+narcissistic+bigot
https://gibiru.com/results.html?q=Steve+Petruzzellis+%22NARCISSISTIC+BIGOT%22
Dustin Cook is a functional illiterate fraud
RonB
2021-10-25 20:29:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Exactly what desktop experience? Many Linux distros look a lot like
Windows, sometimes to their detriment. Many popular applications are on
both platforms. Windows finally caught up with 10 and has multiple
desktops.
At home I have both Windows and Linux available and I use Linux 95% of
the time.
A few years back my brother's friend needed to do something on a computer
while he was in town, so my brother let him use his Linux Mint desktop. It
took a longer than expected — and for some reason, when he was about
finished, he asked my brother "what do you think of Linux, I'm thinking of
trying it?" My brother told him, "you've been using Linux for the last half
hour." "I have?"
--
"Name a product that blames its failure on those who don't use it."

"Women are women and men are men, if you
neuter a rooster he's a capon not a hen."
rbowman
2021-10-26 03:47:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Exactly what desktop experience? Many Linux distros look a lot like
Windows, sometimes to their detriment. Many popular applications are on
both platforms. Windows finally caught up with 10 and has multiple
desktops.
At home I have both Windows and Linux available and I use Linux 95% of
the time.
A few years back my brother's friend needed to do something on a computer
while he was in town, so my brother let him use his Linux Mint desktop. It
took a longer than expected — and for some reason, when he was about
finished, he asked my brother "what do you think of Linux, I'm thinking of
trying it?" My brother told him, "you've been using Linux for the last half
hour." "I have?"
There's a lot of crossover. Ubuntu even followed MS down the Metro
rabbit hole for one release, proving a bad idea is a bad idea regardless
of the underlying OS.
RonB
2021-10-25 20:34:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Exactly what desktop experience? Many Linux distros look a lot like
Windows, sometimes to their detriment. Many popular applications are on
both platforms. Windows finally caught up with 10 and has multiple
desktops.
At home I have both Windows and Linux available and I use Linux 95% of
the time.
I think that most of what is compromised in the Linux desktop experience
has to do with the intuitiveness of the operating system, the clunkiness
of some apps, the inconsistency in the settings applications and the
overall feeling that even though you're supposed to be in complete
control, anything can and likely will fail at any given time. Those
updates, even though they usually work well, they can break things on a
routine basis. To give you an idea, if you're using an NVIDIA GPU and
running something like openSUSE Tumbleweed, you'll install the latest
updates and then, when you reboot, you no longer have access to your
desktop. Most of us will know that it's because the latest NVIDIA GPU,
for whatever reason, isn't supported and that a fix will come after a
few days during which you'll have to use the previous kernel, but
someone who doesn't even know what a kernel is might panic. It's not for
everyone and likely never will be.
OpenSUSE Tumbleweed is a "cutting edge," rolling distribution. (Basically
that means you're constantly in beta.) I prefer stable over cutting edge
(which is one of the main reasons I use Linux Mint). In Linux you have many
choices.
--
"Name a product that blames its failure on those who don't use it."

"Women are women and men are men, if you
neuter a rooster he's a capon not a hen."
vallor
2021-10-25 14:35:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop,
many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out
and got himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the
Linux Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS
gave his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around
thinking 'Oh shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming
for Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for
Linux has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package
manager will be used and the versions of the libraries that a user
would have. I don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to
what the Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Slimer is mired in the sludge of Linux from 10 years ago.

Typical anti-advocacy rant: complain about something that really isn't a problem anymore. Used to be
printer setup would get all the whining...
--
-v
RonB
2021-10-25 20:43:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by vallor
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop,
many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out
and got himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the
Linux Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS
gave his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around
thinking 'Oh shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming
for Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for
Linux has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package
manager will be used and the versions of the libraries that a user
would have. I don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to
what the Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Slimer is mired in the sludge of Linux from 10 years ago.
Typical anti-advocacy rant: complain about something that really isn't a problem anymore. Used to be
printer setup would get all the whining...
People are still complaining about it and you're free to visit your
choice of non-Usenet forum to get a list of their complaints.
If you're using Linux consistently, you get into a habit of buying printers
(or other peripherals) that you know support Linux. For example, when I buy
a laptop to fix up for Linux, I plan on the possibility of paying an extra $5
to buy an Intel WiFi card, in case it's using Broadcom. Broadcom WiFi cards
have to be backwards engineered and I usually find they're "iffy" on Linux
(which is putting it kindly) — so why fight it? Just install an Intel WiFi
card, which work "out of box" because the drivers don't have to be backwards
engineered (Intel works with the open source community).

Problem solved.
--
"Name a product that blames its failure on those who don't use it."

"Women are women and men are men, if you
neuter a rooster he's a capon not a hen."
chrisv
2021-10-25 21:21:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by vallor
Slimer is mired in the sludge of Linux from 10 years ago.
Typical anti-advocacy rant: complain about something that really isn't a problem anymore. Used to be
printer setup would get all the whining...
People are still complaining about it and you're free to visit your
choice of non-Usenet forum to get a list of their complaints.
Why did you stop calling yourself "Hadron" Quark, Slime?
--
"According to the zealots here, Linux is already perfect." - Hadron
Quark, lying shamelessly
Gremlin the Functionally Illiterate Fraud
2021-10-25 15:18:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
--
@RabidHussar
The teller of untruths AKA Digger 'The Shill' Thomnson does it every time.
Then the deluge begins. Because the wimp just has to run to other groups.
Nobody is being controlled by David. Digger 'The Shill' Thomnson's toned
down the hundreds of egotistical, senseless threads he used to write but
he is certainly consistent in the morality department. He just uses puppets
more to create those attacks. Some time ago I did work on and showed some
Objective-C for the front end which is the only thing you can do when trying
to avoid Digger 'The Shill' Thomnson's dishonest crap while reading with
Google Groups. Over and over, the claim is Digger 'The Shill' Thomnson wants
to "talk tech", but the guy spends most of his time whining about "ChromeOS".



--
Top 15 Ways Digger 'The Shill' Thomnson Trolls!!
https://www.bing.com/search?q=%22FUNCTIONAL%20ILLITERATE%20FRAUD%22
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=steve+carroll%3A+narcissistic+bigot
https://www.womply.com/biz/89a-dental-care-prescott-valley-AZ/
Steve Carroll the Narcissistic Bigot
RonB
2021-10-25 23:06:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Agreed about the browser. My mom and dad spend their entire time on
their computers in the browser and, in most cases, on either Facebook or
Hotmail. How my mother still manages to get viruses or malware though is
beyond me. Just a few days ago, I had to fix some issue where an ad
would constantly tell her that she has a virus on her computer and
recommend that she install McAfee. Even when you closed the ad, another
would come in and another and another. I don't think it was a virus but
it was annoying nonetheless and required Edge to be reset and all
history to be cleared. The point here is that she still managed to get
it from going on exactly two web sites.
By opening attachments in her email?
--
"Name a product that blames its failure on those who don't use it."

"Women are women and men are men, if you
neuter a rooster he's a capon not a hen."
RabidHussar
2021-10-25 23:20:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Agreed about the browser. My mom and dad spend their entire time on
their computers in the browser and, in most cases, on either Facebook or
Hotmail. How my mother still manages to get viruses or malware though is
beyond me. Just a few days ago, I had to fix some issue where an ad
would constantly tell her that she has a virus on her computer and
recommend that she install McAfee. Even when you closed the ad, another
would come in and another and another. I don't think it was a virus but
it was annoying nonetheless and required Edge to be reset and all
history to be cleared. The point here is that she still managed to get
it from going on exactly two web sites.
By opening attachments in her email?
It seems that's what it is or at least it's what she thought happened
but I checked her e-mail and the content she considers suspicious is a
link to a friend's Google Drive containing loads of boring photos of her
family. Who knows where she went to get such ads..
--
@RabidHussar
Happy to shove that vaccine of yours up your ass
rbowman
2021-10-26 03:38:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Except on Apple :)

https://www.theregister.com/2021/10/22/safari_risks_becoming_the_new_ie/

The developer that works with Safari has problems with our Angular app
that don't happen on Edge, Chrome, Brave, Firefox, etc.
rbowman
2021-10-26 13:49:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Except on Apple :)
https://www.theregister.com/2021/10/22/safari_risks_becoming_the_new_ie/
The developer that works with Safari has problems with our Angular app
that don't happen on Edge, Chrome, Brave, Firefox, etc.
Figures. Poor developer drew the short straw, I guess.
No, that's the guy who is leaving. He'd worked with iOS before we hired
him. And he was just getting broken in... Programmers tend to be
taciturn but getting him to talk was difficult. He wasn't as bad as one
guy I interviewed. Anything beyond yes or no was a stretch. I took a
pass on him. As far as I could tell he was competent but the way he
presented himself would make people nervous.
Helmut Achterberg
2021-10-26 22:44:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Except on Apple :)
https://www.theregister.com/2021/10/22/safari_risks_becoming_the_new_ie/
The developer that works with Safari has problems with our Angular app
that don't happen on Edge, Chrome, Brave, Firefox, etc.
Figures. Poor developer drew the short straw, I guess.
No, that's the guy who is leaving. He'd worked with iOS before we hired
him. And he was just getting broken in... Programmers tend to be
taciturn but getting him to talk was difficult. He wasn't as bad as one
guy I interviewed. Anything beyond yes or no was a stretch. I took a
pass on him. As far as I could tell he was competent but the way he
presented himself would make people nervous.
A while back, my younger brother (who is a programmer) was looking for his
next job. He bragged to me about the following conversation... (he was being
screened by someone who obviously wasn't knowledgeable about programming —
she just had a list of questions to ask).
"Do you know how to program in C++?"
"Yes."
"Do you know how to program in C?"
"Well, lady, obviously if I can program in C++..." (And it apparently it
went down hill from there.)
I told my brother, "You know, you just lost that job, right?"
"She was an idiot..."
"She was doing her job, pre-screening from a list of questions. All you had
to say was 'yes.'"
He's always managed to get work, despite being brash — but he's not the only
programmer I've known who seems to have this type of personality. When I was
a phone tech I used to run into some of these folks in the IT department.
Communication skills and programmers don't always seem to go together.
That said, I've known some really nice programmers as well — my brother
isn't one of them (on the job). "Idiot" seems to be one of his favorite
words.
Sounds like a company I once worked for. They were a huge IT
outsourcing company and the joke was they kept the real hardcore
techs in a rubber room and far from the clients because although they
were quite intelligent and knew their area of expertise very well,
they had zero social skills. Some literally had to be asked to change
their clothes and take a bath. Others would work all hours of the day
into the night banging out code.
It was my first introduction to very smart, gifted technical type
people.
I'm retired now and wonder if companies still have dedicated
employees like this?
Somehow I have my doubts.
--
Helmut
"If you don't like Linux, you might tick incorrectly"
Stephen Petruzzellis
2021-10-27 01:35:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Helmut Achterberg
Post by rbowman
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Except on Apple :)
https://www.theregister.com/2021/10/22/safari_risks_becoming_the_new_ie/
The developer that works with Safari has problems with our Angular app
that don't happen on Edge, Chrome, Brave, Firefox, etc.
Figures. Poor developer drew the short straw, I guess.
No, that's the guy who is leaving. He'd worked with iOS before we hired
him. And he was just getting broken in... Programmers tend to be
taciturn but getting him to talk was difficult. He wasn't as bad as one
guy I interviewed. Anything beyond yes or no was a stretch. I took a
pass on him. As far as I could tell he was competent but the way he
presented himself would make people nervous.
A while back, my younger brother (who is a programmer) was looking for his
next job. He bragged to me about the following conversation... (he was being
screened by someone who obviously wasn't knowledgeable about programming —
she just had a list of questions to ask).
"Do you know how to program in C++?"
"Yes."
"Do you know how to program in C?"
"Well, lady, obviously if I can program in C++..." (And it apparently it
went down hill from there.)
I told my brother, "You know, you just lost that job, right?"
"She was an idiot..."
"She was doing her job, pre-screening from a list of questions. All you had
to say was 'yes.'"
He's always managed to get work, despite being brash — but he's not the only
programmer I've known who seems to have this type of personality. When I was
a phone tech I used to run into some of these folks in the IT department.
Communication skills and programmers don't always seem to go together.
That said, I've known some really nice programmers as well — my brother
isn't one of them (on the job). "Idiot" seems to be one of his favorite
words.
Sounds like a company I once worked for. They were a huge IT
outsourcing company and the joke was they kept the real hardcore
techs in a rubber room and far from the clients because although they
were quite intelligent and knew their area of expertise very well,
they had zero social skills. Some literally had to be asked to change
their clothes and take a bath. Others would work all hours of the day
into the night banging out code.
It was my first introduction to very smart, gifted technical type
people.
I'm retired now and wonder if companies still have dedicated
employees like this?
Somehow I have my doubts.
--
Helmut
"If you don't like Linux, you might tick incorrectly"
If Shadow calls having his ass handed to him by dozens of people good 'trolling',
then whatever... he is a splendid troll. I do not personally subscribe
to that definition, I use another term. I call Shadow a perfect moron.

A gross fabrication by Shadow. Just Wondering didn't deny uploading it,
but he did not publish it to Vine. Shadow did that, in an page that uses
his ideas.... and he did it because he is obsessed with Shadow kicking
his ass like a one legged man.

I am working on a system which will blow what Linux has away. The advocates
suggest looking for guidance for a FOSS application is trolling.

Trend Micro was initially written and scripted using a pirated copy of
Eclipse, in AppleScript. Right now there are too many "all choice is good"
Linux users and not enough old school users with the patience to help the
people with old computers.

Having to endure the use of 3d printers is not what most want to do.

--
This Trick Gets Women Hot For You
https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-glasser-86860011
<https://groups.google.com/g/rec.photo.digital/c/e7iwP04xhNU>
https://swisscows.com/web?query=%22functionally%20illiterate%20fraud%22
Dustin Cook: Functional Illiterate Fraud
rbowman
2021-10-27 01:35:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Helmut Achterberg
Post by rbowman
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Except on Apple :)
https://www.theregister.com/2021/10/22/safari_risks_becoming_the_new_ie/
The developer that works with Safari has problems with our Angular app
that don't happen on Edge, Chrome, Brave, Firefox, etc.
Figures. Poor developer drew the short straw, I guess.
No, that's the guy who is leaving. He'd worked with iOS before we hired
him. And he was just getting broken in... Programmers tend to be
taciturn but getting him to talk was difficult. He wasn't as bad as one
guy I interviewed. Anything beyond yes or no was a stretch. I took a
pass on him. As far as I could tell he was competent but the way he
presented himself would make people nervous.
A while back, my younger brother (who is a programmer) was looking for his
next job. He bragged to me about the following conversation... (he was being
screened by someone who obviously wasn't knowledgeable about programming —
she just had a list of questions to ask).
"Do you know how to program in C++?"
"Yes."
"Do you know how to program in C?"
"Well, lady, obviously if I can program in C++..." (And it apparently it
went down hill from there.)
I told my brother, "You know, you just lost that job, right?"
"She was an idiot..."
"She was doing her job, pre-screening from a list of questions. All you had
to say was 'yes.'"
He's always managed to get work, despite being brash — but he's not the only
programmer I've known who seems to have this type of personality. When I was
a phone tech I used to run into some of these folks in the IT department.
Communication skills and programmers don't always seem to go together.
That said, I've known some really nice programmers as well — my brother
isn't one of them (on the job). "Idiot" seems to be one of his favorite
words.
Sounds like a company I once worked for. They were a huge IT
outsourcing company and the joke was they kept the real hardcore
techs in a rubber room and far from the clients because although they
were quite intelligent and knew their area of expertise very well,
they had zero social skills. Some literally had to be asked to change
their clothes and take a bath. Others would work all hours of the day
into the night banging out code.
It was my first introduction to very smart, gifted technical type
people.
I'm retired now and wonder if companies still have dedicated
employees like this?
Somehow I have my doubts.
Yeah, they keep us in cubes and throw raw meat over the wall every now
and then. I've had a few technically competent clients that I've enjoyed
working with directly but for the most part I prefer to be buffered by
support, operations, and project managers.

A few years ago they moved us to the other end of the building to put in
new carpets, wire troughs for the cables, and general refresh. When we
moved back the omitted to install phones for engineering. We've never
reminded them.
rbowman
2021-10-27 01:29:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
He's always managed to get work, despite being brash — but he's not the only
programmer I've known who seems to have this type of personality. When I was
a phone tech I used to run into some of these folks in the IT department.
Communication skills and programmers don't always seem to go together.
I wasn't that outspoken but after I was hired the director of
engineering at that time said that during the interview some of my
answers had given the impression of 'Why are you wasting my time?'


I've had a rather non-traditional career and took a few years off from
programming so he was trying to establish if I really knew anything. For
one question he said 'assume unlimited memory'. A lot of the work I'd
done was with embedded microprocessors where you were lucky if you had
2K or ROM.

He must have seen the trends; modern applications often assume you have
unlimited memory, processor cores, and disk space.
rbowman
2021-10-26 03:40:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RonB
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
I'm guessing most corporate Linux development is geared towards the back end,
not so much the GUI or various desktops.
Which would explain why the desktop experience is not so stellar for a
lot of the people who give the operating system a chance.
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
We've been moving towards a browser based product. Quite a few RFP's
(request for proposal) have 'zero footprint' as a bullet point. People
are getting paranoid about installing anything.
Stéphane CARPENTIER
2021-10-29 21:40:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Actually, I'm using qutebrowser which is very different from Edge
Firefox or IE. And I'm learning lisp to be able to use nyxt.
--
Si vous avez du temps à perdre :
https://scarpet42.gitlab.io
rbowman
2021-10-30 00:51:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stéphane CARPENTIER
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Actually, I'm using qutebrowser which is very different from Edge
Firefox or IE. And I'm learning lisp to be able to use nyxt.
My sympathies... I've used a lot of languages in my career but lisp is
the one I actively dislike.
RonB
2021-10-30 12:17:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by Stéphane CARPENTIER
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Actually, I'm using qutebrowser which is very different from Edge
Firefox or IE. And I'm learning lisp to be able to use nyxt.
My sympathies... I've used a lot of languages in my career but lisp is
the one I actively dislike.
I'm not a programmer, but my favorite screenplay "application" is
Fountain-Mode under Emacs. About all I know about Emacs is how to load
and run Fountain-Mode, however.
--
"Name a product that blames its failure on those who don't use it."

"Women are women and men are men, if you
neuter a rooster he's a capon not a hen."
rbowman
2021-10-30 17:13:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by Stéphane CARPENTIER
Most people's "desktop experience" is usually on a web browser these days.
Basically identical in both Linux and Windows (and on a Chromebook).
Actually, I'm using qutebrowser which is very different from Edge
Firefox or IE. And I'm learning lisp to be able to use nyxt.
My sympathies... I've used a lot of languages in my career but lisp is
the one I actively dislike.
I learned the basis of lisp some decades ago, and for me it was only
related with recursion. Now, the more I dive into lisp, the more I
understand what functional programming is. And the more I'm impressed by
it.
I worked my wy through the Wizard book one winter. (Structure and
Interpretation of Computer Programs). Conceptually it was interesting
but I kept thinking to myself 'there a easier ways to do this.'.


https://twobithistory.org/2018/10/14/lisp.html

Possibly tl;dr but scroll down to 'Theory C: Learn to Program'. perhaps
if I were a MIT freshman taking an introductory course I'd think that
was the way things were done but by the time I bought the book from a
fellow programmer's widow I'd had 20 years of real world programming
using various assemblers, FORTRAN, FORTH, C, C++ and so forth.

Like the article says RxJS has Lisp DNA and is some weird shit.
Branimir Maksimovic
2021-10-26 00:46:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
|He doesn't think...
--
7-77-777
Evil Sinner!
with software, you repeat same experiment, expecting different results...
Branimir Maksimovic
2021-10-26 00:54:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
With Linux you don't care about which desktop will be used, you use
either GTK or Qt. Package manager takes care of any popurar
build system you use, either cmake or libtools :P
Stop spewing lies.
--
7-77-777
Evil Sinner!
with software, you repeat same experiment, expecting different results...
Branimir Maksimovic
2021-10-26 01:25:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
With Linux you don't care about which desktop will be used, you use
either GTK or Qt. Package manager takes care of any popurar
build system you use, either cmake or libtools :P
Stop spewing lies.
It's not lies if I'm making assumptions and blatantly saying so,
dumbass. What exactly did the sentence "not that I've done it, but I
imagine that..." mean to you?
It means baseless propaganda...
--
7-77-777
Evil Sinner!
with software, you repeat same experiment, expecting different results...
rbowman
2021-10-26 03:51:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
With Linux you don't care about which desktop will be used, you use
either GTK or Qt. Package manager takes care of any popurar
build system you use, either cmake or libtools :P
Stop spewing lies.
Case in point today. Our build guy had to update MSBuild to match an
update of Mac Mini to Big Sur. The build is on Windows with Xamarin but
the Mini is needed for some obscure reason.

After he upgraded, I tried to build one of our apps and it failed. It
seems the new BuiltTools decided a C++ file needs to include cuchar to
be happy. After every upgrade it takes a while for things to settle down.
RonB
2021-11-03 06:41:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
With Linux you don't care about which desktop will be used, you use
either GTK or Qt. Package manager takes care of any popurar
build system you use, either cmake or libtools :P
Stop spewing lies.
Case in point today. Our build guy had to update MSBuild to match an
update of Mac Mini to Big Sur. The build is on Windows with Xamarin but
the Mini is needed for some obscure reason.
After he upgraded, I tried to build one of our apps and it failed. It
seems the new BuiltTools decided a C++ file needs to include cuchar to
be happy. After every upgrade it takes a while for things to settle down.
Linux, I hold on upgrades all the time :P
Linux is notorious that they don't test at all... They fix 50 bugs,
and give you 2000 more :P
Use a stable, non "cutting-edge" distribution.

Non-problem solved.
--
"Name a product that blames its failure on those who don't use it."

"Women are women and men are men, if you
neuter a rooster he's a capon not a hen."
RabidHussar
2021-11-03 13:01:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as
programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
With Linux you don't care about which desktop will be used, you use
either GTK or Qt. Package manager takes care of any popurar
build system you use, either cmake or libtools :P
Stop spewing lies.
Case in point today. Our build guy had to update MSBuild to match an
update of Mac Mini to Big Sur. The build is on Windows with Xamarin but
the Mini is needed for some obscure reason.
After he upgraded, I tried to build one of our apps and it failed. It
seems the new BuiltTools decided a C++ file needs to include  cuchar to
be happy. After every upgrade it takes a while for things to settle down.
Linux, I hold on upgrades all the time :P
Linux is notorious that they don't test at all... They fix 50 bugs,
and give you 2000 more :P
News flash: Microsoft will fix the printer bug. Again. I've lost count
of the attempts.
The printer bug is mostly a security problem in Windows 10. Otherwise,
it works fine. However, the operating system will often forget your
configuration and force you to reinstall it. In 11, the problem is gone.
--
@RabidHussar
rbowman
2021-11-03 14:01:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by rbowman
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as
programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
With Linux you don't care about which desktop will be used, you use
either GTK or Qt. Package manager takes care of any popurar
build system you use, either cmake or libtools :P
Stop spewing lies.
Case in point today. Our build guy had to update MSBuild to match an
update of Mac Mini to Big Sur. The build is on Windows with Xamarin but
the Mini is needed for some obscure reason.
After he upgraded, I tried to build one of our apps and it failed. It
seems the new BuiltTools decided a C++ file needs to include cuchar to
be happy. After every upgrade it takes a while for things to settle down.
Linux, I hold on upgrades all the time :P
Linux is notorious that they don't test at all... They fix 50 bugs,
and give you 2000 more :P
News flash: Microsoft will fix the printer bug. Again. I've lost count
of the attempts.
The printer bug is mostly a security problem in Windows 10. Otherwise,
it works fine. However, the operating system will often forget your
configuration and force you to reinstall it. In 11, the problem is gone.
So far I haven't had to reinstall 10 on any machine but one of the QA
people did. I don't know what the exact problem was but a wipe and
reinstall was the answer. He was pissed since he expected IT to fix the
problem, not put him back to ground zero.
RabidHussar
2021-11-04 12:02:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by rbowman
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my
desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went
out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
With Linux you don't care about which desktop will be used, you use
either GTK or Qt. Package manager takes care of any popurar
build system you use, either cmake or libtools :P
Stop spewing lies.
Case in point today. Our build guy had to update MSBuild to match an
update of Mac Mini to Big Sur. The build is on Windows with Xamarin but
the Mini is needed for some obscure reason.
After he upgraded, I tried to build one of our apps and it failed. It
seems the new BuiltTools decided a C++ file needs to include
cuchar to
be happy. After every upgrade it takes a while for things to settle down.
Linux, I hold on upgrades all the time :P
Linux is notorious that they don't test at all... They fix 50 bugs,
and give you 2000 more :P
News flash: Microsoft will fix the printer bug. Again. I've lost count
of the attempts.
The printer bug is mostly a security problem in Windows 10. Otherwise,
it works fine. However, the operating system will often forget your
configuration and force you to reinstall it. In 11, the problem is gone.
So far I haven't had to reinstall 10 on any machine but one of the QA
people did. I don't know what the exact problem was but a wipe and
reinstall was the answer. He was pissed since he expected IT to fix the
problem, not put him back to ground zero.
I just installed the operating system which came by default on my old
laptop: Windows 8.1. As bad as it is, I can at least say that unlike
Windows 10, it's fast and it generally works properly across the board.
My hatred for 10 cannot be underestimated. I truly don't like the OS and
believe that both 11 and 8.1 were superior products (8.1 for the speed
at the very least). If people like 10, that's great but I don't.

I am aware that support for this OS will end in 2023. When that happens,
if this causes an issue, I'll just put Linux on it. but I simply can't
stomach 10 anymore.
--
@RabidHussar
RonB
2021-11-04 15:45:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RabidHussar
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by rbowman
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my
desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went
out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
With Linux you don't care about which desktop will be used, you use
either GTK or Qt. Package manager takes care of any popurar
build system you use, either cmake or libtools :P
Stop spewing lies.
Case in point today. Our build guy had to update MSBuild to match an
update of Mac Mini to Big Sur. The build is on Windows with Xamarin but
the Mini is needed for some obscure reason.
After he upgraded, I tried to build one of our apps and it failed. It
seems the new BuiltTools decided a C++ file needs to include
cuchar to
be happy. After every upgrade it takes a while for things to settle down.
Linux, I hold on upgrades all the time :P
Linux is notorious that they don't test at all... They fix 50 bugs,
and give you 2000 more :P
News flash: Microsoft will fix the printer bug. Again. I've lost count
of the attempts.
The printer bug is mostly a security problem in Windows 10. Otherwise,
it works fine. However, the operating system will often forget your
configuration and force you to reinstall it. In 11, the problem is gone.
So far I haven't had to reinstall 10 on any machine but one of the QA
people did. I don't know what the exact problem was but a wipe and
reinstall was the answer. He was pissed since he expected IT to fix the
problem, not put him back to ground zero.
I just installed the operating system which came by default on my old
laptop: Windows 8.1. As bad as it is, I can at least say that unlike
Windows 10, it's fast and it generally works properly across the board.
My hatred for 10 cannot be underestimated. I truly don't like the OS and
believe that both 11 and 8.1 were superior products (8.1 for the speed
at the very least). If people like 10, that's great but I don't.
I am aware that support for this OS will end in 2023. When that happens,
if this causes an issue, I'll just put Linux on it. but I simply can't
stomach 10 anymore.
I'm lucky. I don't have to deal with any version of Windows.
--
A recession is when your neighbor loses his job.
A depression is when you lose yours. A recovery is
when Dr. Fauci loses his. — Gov. DeSantis
RabidHussar
2021-11-04 16:13:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by rbowman
Post by RabidHussar
Post by rbowman
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by RonB
Post by RabidHussar
Post by RabidHussar
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead?  I'm on my
desktop, many
days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
It just works so well that one of its biggest advocates went
out and got
himself a Mac just like most of the people sitting on the Linux
Foundation do.
The programmer who had been doing most of the development on iOS gave
his notice this week. The rest of us are sitting around thinking 'Oh
shit! Who's going to draw the short straw?'
I'm sure that programming for iOS is not as annoying as programming for
Linux, to be honest.
Why would you think that?
Not that I've done it, but I imagine that anyone who develops for Linux
has to consider what GUI a user will be in, which package manager will
be used and the versions of the libraries that a user would have. I
don't know, it just seems so cumbersome in comparison to what the
Windows and Mac programmers do.
With Linux you don't care about which desktop will be used, you use
either GTK or Qt. Package manager takes care of any popurar
build system you use, either cmake or libtools :P
Stop spewing lies.
Case in point today. Our build guy had to update MSBuild to match an
update of Mac Mini to Big Sur. The build is on Windows with Xamarin but
the Mini is needed for some obscure reason.
After he upgraded, I tried to build one of our apps and it failed. It
seems the new BuiltTools decided a C++ file needs to include
cuchar to
be happy. After every upgrade it takes a while for things to settle down.
Linux, I hold on upgrades all the time :P
Linux is notorious that they don't test at all... They fix 50 bugs,
and give you 2000 more :P
News flash: Microsoft will fix the printer bug. Again. I've lost count
of the attempts.
The printer bug is mostly a security problem in Windows 10. Otherwise,
it works fine. However, the operating system will often forget your
configuration and force you to reinstall it. In 11, the problem is gone.
So far I haven't had to reinstall 10 on any machine but one of the QA
people did. I don't know what the exact problem was but a wipe and
reinstall was the answer. He was pissed since he expected IT to fix the
problem, not put him back to ground zero.
I just installed the operating system which came by default on my old
laptop: Windows 8.1. As bad as it is, I can at least say that unlike
Windows 10, it's fast and it generally works properly across the board.
My hatred for 10 cannot be underestimated. I truly don't like the OS and
believe that both 11 and 8.1 were superior products (8.1 for the speed
at the very least). If people like 10, that's great but I don't.
I am aware that support for this OS will end in 2023. When that happens,
if this causes an issue, I'll just put Linux on it. but I simply can't
stomach 10 anymore.
I'm lucky. I don't have to deal with any version of Windows.
Well, this one is getting Linux on it once I confirm that there's
basically nothing I can do about the battery on this machine. It's the
third battery this machine has gotten in its lifetime and, to say the
least, it's retarded. If your battery is at 100% and running the NVIDIA
GPU and I disconnect the AC, the laptop immediately powers off and won't
turn on. If it's at 100% but running on the integrated chip and I
disconnect the AC, it goes down to about 78% (3 hours or so) and then
shuts down suddenly. Meanwhile, this is what I see in BatteryInfoView:
--
@RabidHussar
Happy to shove that vaccine of yours up your ass.
rbowman
2021-10-23 17:53:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
No drama. No BSODs. No corrupt Registry files. No malware. No "reboot,
reboot, reinstall." Where's the challenge in that?
Yeah, it's sort of boring. I'm showing an uptime of 149 days. iirc it
was over a year before the power went out last spring for longer than
the UPS could handle.

Windows is a guaranteed reboot after every Patch Tuesday and even SQL
Server Management Studio, Visual Studio, and so forth need a reboot so
they can sort out the registry.

Some of our clients are touchy about downtime so they never patch the
servers. Boy, ain't it fun when they finally have to reboot...

Windows and five nines never should be used in the same sentence.
Stéphane CARPENTIER
2021-10-23 19:57:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I can't recall the last time I had a BSOD or a virus.
For a BSOD, it's another problem. But for virus, it's normal. Now, when
someone has a virus, except for a ransomware, he doesn't know about it.
It's long gone the time when a virus was breaking a computer. Now, a
compromised computer is used as a bot to attack companies.
--
Si vous avez du temps à perdre :
https://scarpet42.gitlab.io
J***@.
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Botnets run on infected Linux routers, not smart phones.
More specifically, the (Linux-Based) MikroTik RouterOS.

MikroTik routers, IoT gateways, WiFi access points,
switches, and mobile network equipment.

https://therecord.media/meet-meris-the-new-250000-strong-ddos-botnet-terrorizing-the-internet/
Branimir Maksimovic
2021-10-24 03:50:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J***@.
Botnets run on infected Linux routers, not smart phones.
More specifically, the (Linux-Based) MikroTik RouterOS.
MikroTik routers, IoT gateways, WiFi access points,
switches, and mobile network equipment.
https://therecord.media/meet-meris-the-new-250000-strong-ddos-botnet-terrorizing-the-internet/
I saw once botnet with 50k ip's :P
--
7-77-777
Evil Sinner!
with software, you repeat same experiment, expecting different results...
Branimir Maksimovic
2021-10-24 03:49:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Botnets run on infected Linux routers, not smart phones.
Yout wish :P
--
7-77-777
Evil Sinner!
with software, you repeat same experiment, expecting different results...
rbowman
2021-10-24 00:15:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
No drama. No BSODs. No corrupt Registry files. No malware. No "reboot,
reboot, reinstall." Where's the challenge in that?
Yeah, it's sort of boring. I'm showing an uptime of 149 days. iirc it
was over a year before the power went out last spring for longer than
the UPS could handle.
Windows is a guaranteed reboot after every Patch Tuesday and even SQL
Server Management Studio, Visual Studio, and so forth need a reboot so
they can sort out the registry.
Some of our clients are touchy about downtime so they never patch the
servers. Boy, ain't it fun when they finally have to reboot...
Windows and five nines never should be used in the same sentence.
Five 9's for phone switches went out the door when VoIP showed up. I've
never had to do anything with servers, so I don't know a lot about them.
A lot of servers are running Linux, even some of Microsoft's.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/microsoft-released-cbl-mariner-linux-distro

On a local level, say a county IT department, they will opt for Windows
Server. Hiring Microsoft Certified Whatevers gives them a warm fuzzy and
there's a feeling that Linux is not supported even if they went with RHEL.

It's a hard sell. We had two sites that were running Linux for the back
end servers but as soon as the organization Linux fan moves on they go
for Windows. The old saying 'Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM'
applies to Microsoft now.

The tech sites point out how many organizations are running with known
vulnerabilities and part of that is they don't run updates that required
taking the system down. There's also the feeling that if it's working,
don't screw with it which is reinforced by fiascos like 'So sorry your
printers aren't working anymore. We'll have a fix shortly'.
Dustin who does stuff with miceless computers
2021-10-24 02:52:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by rbowman
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
No drama. No BSODs. No corrupt Registry files. No malware. No "reboot,
reboot, reinstall." Where's the challenge in that?
Yeah, it's sort of boring. I'm showing an uptime of 149 days. iirc it
was over a year before the power went out last spring for longer than
the UPS could handle.
Windows is a guaranteed reboot after every Patch Tuesday and even SQL
Server Management Studio, Visual Studio, and so forth need a reboot so
they can sort out the registry.
Some of our clients are touchy about downtime so they never patch the
servers. Boy, ain't it fun when they finally have to reboot...
Windows and five nines never should be used in the same sentence.
Five 9's for phone switches went out the door when VoIP showed up. I've
never had to do anything with servers, so I don't know a lot about them.
A lot of servers are running Linux, even some of Microsoft's.
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/microsoft-released-cbl-mariner-linux-distro
On a local level, say a county IT department, they will opt for Windows
Server. Hiring Microsoft Certified Whatevers gives them a warm fuzzy and
there's a feeling that Linux is not supported even if they went with RHEL.
It's a hard sell. We had two sites that were running Linux for the back
end servers but as soon as the organization Linux fan moves on they go
for Windows. The old saying 'Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM'
applies to Microsoft now.
The tech sites point out how many organizations are running with known
vulnerabilities and part of that is they don't run updates that required
taking the system down. There's also the feeling that if it's working,
don't screw with it which is reinforced by fiascos like 'So sorry your
printers aren't working anymore. We'll have a fix shortly'.
"Somewhere between 1996 or 2005 I trusted Glasser Michael Snit, the completely
absurd liar" - Pothead. Pothead would have to be suffering from mental illness
to be unsure of if he "never had" designed a website. Sound like anyone
in here? When Pothead can not remember his past claims and exercises make-
believe, self-image saving idiocy later, it's very obvious what his game
is.

It was Pothead who forged me (and others) and then tried to deny it. I
just don't get the point in Pothead continuing to make that claim, when
they know it's easily proved false. I will no longer bring up the whackiest,
so far, series of lies they've written about me to date; because many honest
experts did as I asked and told Pothead directly that they did, of course,
engage in deceit toward me in regards to that idea.


--
What Every Entrepreneur Must Know
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=%22NARCISSISTIC+BIGOT%22
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Steve%20Petruzzellis%20narcissistic%20bigot
https://www.opensecrets.org/political-action-committees-pacs/C00166710/donors/2016
Dustin Cook: Functionally Illiterate Fraud
Branimir Maksimovic
2021-10-24 03:48:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Post by rbowman
Post by vallor
Maybe we could talk about Linux instead? I'm on my desktop, many days of running just Linux.
Linux sneaks in every now and then...
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
No drama. No BSODs. No corrupt Registry files. No malware. No "reboot,
reboot, reinstall." Where's the challenge in that?
Yeah, it's sort of boring. I'm showing an uptime of 149 days. iirc it
was over a year before the power went out last spring for longer than
the UPS could handle.
Windows is a guaranteed reboot after every Patch Tuesday and even SQL
Server Management Studio, Visual Studio, and so forth need a reboot so
they can sort out the registry.
Which means bad programming. Config file change shouldn't influence
kernel...
Post by rbowman
Some of our clients are touchy about downtime so they never patch the
servers. Boy, ain't it fun when they finally have to reboot...
Windows and five nines never should be used in the same sentence.
--
7-77-777
Evil Sinner!
with software, you repeat same experiment, expecting different results...
J***@.
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Branimir Maksimovic
Linux just works, it not interresting :P
No drama. No BSODs. No corrupt Registry files.
No malware. No "reboot, reboot, reinstall."
No (ultra customizable) "Nuance Dragon professional" ( speech to text ).
No (ultra customizable) "Hot Virtual Keyboard".
No (ultra customizable) Logitech g600 mouse, 39 buttons.
No (ultra customizable) Logitech g635 USB HeadSet.
No (ultra customizable) Visual Studio ( custom macros and extensions ).

No: Loading Image...
J***@.
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
What topics are allowed in a sports bar, Scott ?

Last I checked, Kim JongUn & Chairman Xi weren't here.

China & North Korea are scared sh*tless of South Korea.

North Koreans providing South Korean content are executed.

China works tirelessly to ban South Korean content.

Legally, no one in China may watch "Squid Game".

Chinese social media reported 1.7 billion searches
for "Squid Game"... oopsie !

In Squid Game, the last 3 players represent:

-- South Korea's Poor: Pathetic.
-- North Korean defectors: Dangerous Victims.
-- South Korea's Rich: Dangerous Winners.

Seattle has no love for those who don't embrace their apocalypse cult;
no love at all... Zip, Zero, Nada.

The less people work ( especially firemen, teachers & police )
the better... no gig workers nor small businesses, thank you very much.

Landlords are demonized.

Add hungry Haitians to the mix, and you've got the ideal society,
Seattle says.
STALKING_TARGET_89
2021-10-23 13:18:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J***@.
What topics are allowed in a sports bar, Scott ?
Last I checked, Kim JongUn & Chairman Xi weren't here.
China & North Korea are scared sh*tless of South Korea.
North Koreans providing South Korean content are executed.
China works tirelessly to ban South Korean content.
Legally, no one in China may watch "Squid Game".
Chinese social media reported 1.7 billion searches
for "Squid Game"... oopsie !
-- South Korea's Poor: Pathetic.
-- North Korean defectors: Dangerous Victims.
-- South Korea's Rich: Dangerous Winners.
Seattle has no love for those who don't embrace their apocalypse cult;
no love at all... Zip, Zero, Nada.
The less people work ( especially firemen, teachers & police )
the better... no gig workers nor small businesses, thank you very much.
Landlords are demonized.
Add hungry Haitians to the mix, and you've got the ideal society,
Seattle says.
Is Snit Glasser jealous about Gregory Hall having five web pages warning
people about what he is, vs the single one he earned? All that Gregory Hall
cares about is that Gregory Hall gets to impart his crank call and then hang
up and giggle about it. The fact that Snit Glasser is an unwitting victim
on the other end of the phone is what's funny. Several of us reported him
years ago. As expected, it did squat to stop the dolt.

Snit Glasser shared a specific series of signature lines several times now,
and invited Gregory Hall to show which ones aren't accurate and provide the
testimony to back his allegation. Not one single time has Gregory Hall done
so.

And in response you have nothing but an attempt to start a circus.

Gregory Hall showed himself to be a fraud by pretending to not rebut Snit
Glasser via loudly proclaiming *plonk* and then assailing him anyway using
a 3rd party. It's the same thing that happens in every group Gregory Hall
invades.


-
"You'll notice how quickly he loses interest when everything is about him.
He clearly wants the attention"
Steve Carroll, making the dumbest comment ever uttered.
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